Dust.

Good morning!

First of all, I want to say I really enjoy the Kaiju Addicts site. I discovered it around the time of the 2014 movie, when I also started getting into the older movies (up to that point I had only seen the 1998 movie and Godzilla vs Monster Zero). Your reviews helped me decide on getting my own Godzilla 2003 X-Plus figure. Even though I don’t intend to get any more figures, I still look forward to your reviews.

I have a question I’m hoping you can help with. I keep my Godzilla clean by wiping it down with a damp paper towel now and then, but after a few years a lot of dust has gathered between his fins and the folds of his skin. I can’t wipe harder with the paper towel because the figure’s texture will just tear it up. I also don’t want to risk taking any paint off the figure. I thought perhaps I could use compressed air, but I decided to ask you, first. How do you clean your X-Plus figures?

Thanks for your time!
– Kristofer R.

Hey, Kris!

I usually use a soft paint brush to lightly dust my figures off. (The kind you paint walls with.) I usually do this at least once a year. The shape of the brush makes it easy to get in between the rows of dorsal spines.

Some collectors run their X-Plus figures under the sink or in the shower. That’s a perfectly fine thing to do. Just try to avoid having the water go inside the figure. And try not to use a lot of pressure.

In your case, I would not use the damp paper towel method any more. What I think is happening is that the water accumulates in the deep parts of the figure’s texture and takes some dust with it. You can’t reach this with the paper towel and the water needs to simply evaporate. But the dust that the water took with it stays there in the creases.

If I were you I would get the soft paint brush and dust it off first. And then run it under water to try to get the dust stuck in the texture.

A word about not doing anything: These vinyls sometimes off-gas. If you have a lot of dust on them, the gas can’t escape. Some of this gas accumulates and combines with the dust on the surface of the figure. This makes your figures sticky.

John